A Dump Full of Agitation, Grunts, Open Maws and Ridiculous Grimaces

Streams of demons fall from paradise and pile up arses over backwards under the swords of angels and archangels with serene features and unsullied tunics, making the inferior part of Brueghel (the Elder)’s painting a dump full of agitation, grunts, open maws, and ridiculous grimaces that almost hide the horns of the Moloch that governs them and made them fall.

Ah, France, country of liberty, equality, and fraternity! Country of human rights and respect of differences! Country where opinion reigns and is always respected! Ah, France, and its thousand-year-old heart that only beats in front of the television set, the flat, the plasma screens, and their cables, satellites, bouquets of channels, remotes, pluralism, openness, quarrels, striptease. One small screen for a man but a giant window open onto humanity!

Journalists are good at their jobs, they say it themselves, they congratulate themselves, find themselves effective, objective, independent, make friends with ministers, captains of industry, and make a good living, in the warm.

But have you seen how they treat their guests, how they attack them, cut them short, assail them with questions, don’t listen to their answers, ignore their proofs, sweep their arguments away with a knowing smile, make fun of their convictions? They are buttoned-up in their ignorance until they choke, suffocated by their superior airs; they live in packs, waiting for the curée, for the gutting of the one they did not make come but to boost the ratings and offer a killing spectacle that will prove once more that they are the greatest, the strongest, the finest, the cleverest, and that they might deserve being paid a bit more.

For they have to live in the nicest parts of Paris, and nourish their megalomanias.

What do I see in all that? A Brueghelian painting.

A dump full of agitation, grunts, open maws, and ridiculous grimaces that almost hide the horns of the Moloch that governs them… and would like to make you fall.

Bruno Adrie

Copyright © 2015 Bruno Adrie – All rights reserved

translated by Clara Piraud

Original version (French)